If you cannot find a definition here, there are a few other places to learn more about health insurance terms:

Healthcare.gov
www.healthcare.gov/glossary

National Association of Insurance Commissioners
www.naic.org/consumer_glossary.htm

Benefit Year

A year of benefits coverage under an individual health insurance plan. The benefit year for plans bought inside or outside the Marketplace begins January 1 of each year and ends December 31 of the same year. Your coverage ends December 31 even if your coverage started after January 1. Any changes to benefits or rates to a health insurance plan are made at the beginning of the calendar year.

Benefits

The health care items or services covered under a health insurance plan. Covered benefits and excluded services are defined in the health insurance plan's coverage documents. In Medicaid or CHIP, covered benefits and excluded services are defined in state program rules.

Brand Name (Drugs)

A drug sold by a drug company under a specific name or trademark and that is protected by a patent. Brand name drugs may be available by prescription or over the counter.

Catastrophic Health Plan

Health plans that meet all of the requirements applicable to other Qualified Health Plans (QHPs) but that don't cover any benefits other than 3 primary care visits per year before the plan's deductible is met. The premium amount you pay each month for health care is generally lower than for other QHPs, but the out-of-pocket costs for deductibles, copayments, and coinsurance are generally higher. To qualify for a catastrophic plan, you must be under 30 years old OR get a "hardship exemption" because the Marketplace determined that you're unable to afford health coverage.

Children's Health Insurance Program (CHIP)

Insurance program jointly funded by state and federal government that provides health coverage to low-income children and, in some states, pregnant women in families who earn too much income to qualify for Medicaid but can't afford to purchase private health insurance coverage.

COBRA

A federal law that may allow you to temporarily keep health coverage after your employment ends, you lose coverage as a dependent of the covered employee, or another qualifying event. If you elect COBRA coverage, you pay 100% of the premiums, including the share the employer used to pay, plus a small administrative fee.

Coinsurance

Your share of the costs of a covered health care service, calculated as a percent (for example, 20%) of the allowed amount for the service. You pay coinsurance plus any deductibles you owe. For example, if the health insurance or plan's allowed amount for an office visit is $100 and you've met your deductible, your coinsurance payment of 20% would be $20. The health insurance or plan pays the rest of the allowed amount.

Copayment

A fixed amount (for example, $15) you pay for a covered health care service, usually when you get the service. The amount can vary by the type of covered health care service.

Cost Sharing

The share of costs covered by your insurance that you pay out of your own pocket. This term generally includes deductibles, coinsurance, and copayments, or similar charges, but it doesn't include premiums, balance billing amounts for non-network providers, or the cost of non-covered services. Cost sharing in Medicaid and CHIP also includes premiums.

Cost-Sharing Reduction

A discount that lowers the amount you have to pay out-of-pocket for deductibles, coinsurance, and copayments. You can get this reduction if you get health insurance through the Marketplace, your income is below a certain level, and you choose a health plan from the Silver plan category. If you're a member of a federally recognized tribe, you may qualify for additional cost-sharing benefits.

Deductible

The amount you owe for health care services your health insurance or plan covers before your health insurance or plan begins to pay. For example, if your deductible is $1,000, your plan won't pay anything until you've met your $1,000 deductible for covered health care services subject to the deductible. The deductible may not apply to all services.

Dental Coverage

Benefits that help pay for the cost of visits to a dentist for basic or preventive services, like teeth cleaning, X-rays, and fillings. In the Marketplace, dental coverage is available either as part of a comprehensive medical plan, or by itself through a "stand-alone" dental plan.

Dependent

A child or other individual for whom a parent, relative, or other person may claim a personal exemption tax deduction.

Disability

A limit in a range of major life activities. This includes activities like seeing, hearing, walking, and tasks like thinking and working. Because different programs may have different disability standards, please check the program you're interested in for its disability standards.

The list of activities mentioned above isn't exhaustive. A legal definition of disability under the Americans with Disabilities Act can be found here: www.ada.gov/pubs/ada.htm. For the proposed Equal Employment Opportunity Commission Americans with Disabilities Act (EEOC ADA) Amendments Act regulations, and related resources, see www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/FR-2009-09-23/html/E9-22840.htm

Drug List

A list of prescription drugs covered by a prescription drug plan or another insurance plan offering prescription drug benefits. Also called a formulary.

Emergency Services

Evaluation of an emergency medical condition and treatment to keep the condition from getting worse.

Excluded Services

Health care services that your health insurance or plan doesn't pay for or cover.

Exclusive Provider Organization (EPO) Plan

A managed care plan where services are covered only if you go to doctors, specialists, or hospitals in the plan's network (except in an emergency).

Federal Poverty Level (FPL)

A measure of income level issued annually by the Department of Health and Human Services. Federal poverty levels are used to determine your eligibility for certain programs and benefits.

Federally Recognized Tribe

Any Indian or Alaska Native tribe, band, nation, pueblo, village or community that the Department of the Interior acknowledges to exist as an Indian tribe.

See www.bia.gov/WhoWeAre/BIA/OIS/TribalGovernmentServices/TribalDirectory/

Fee or Penalty

If you can afford health insurance but choose not to buy it, there is a fee (or penalty) that you will have to pay. See www.healthcare.gov for the potential amount you might be required to pay.

Flexible Spending Account (FSA)

Also known as a Flexible Spending Arrangement, FSAs are an arrangement you set up through your employer to pay for many of your out-of-pocket medical expenses with tax-free dollars. These expenses include insurance copayments and deductibles, and qualified prescription drugs, insulin, and medical devices. You decide how much of your pre-tax wages you want taken out of your paycheck and put into an FSA. You don't have to pay taxes on this money. Your employer's plan sets a limit on the amount you can put into an FSA each year.

There is no carry-over of FSA funds. This means that FSA funds you don't spend by the end of the plan year can't be used for expenses in the next year. An exception is if your employer's FSA plan permits you to use unused FSA funds for expenses incurred during a grace period of up to 2.5 months after the end of the FSA plan year.

Formulary

A list of prescription drugs covered by a prescription drug plan or another insurance plan offering prescription drug benefits. Also called a drug list.

Full-time Employee

An employee who works an average of at least 30 hours per week (so part-time would be less than 30 hours per week).

Generic Drugs

A prescription drug that has the same active-ingredient formula as a brand name drug. Generic drugs usually cost less than brand name drugs. The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) rates these drugs to be as safe and effective as brand name drugs.

Group Health Plan

In general, a health plan offered by an employer or employee organization that provides health coverage to employees and their families.

Health Coverage

Legal entitlement to payment or reimbursement for your health care costs, generally under a contract with a health insurance company, a group health plan offered in connection with employment, or a government program like Medicare, Medicaid, or the Children's Health Insurance Program (CHIP).

Health Insurance

A contract that requires your health insurer to pay some or all of your health care costs in exchange for a premium.

Health Insurance Marketplace

Also referred to as the affordable insurance exchange, the Health Insurance Marketplace is a resource where individuals, families, and small businesses can: learn about their health coverage options; compare health insurance plans based on costs, benefits, and other important features; choose a plan; and enroll in coverage. The Marketplace also provides information on programs that help people with low to moderate income and resources pay for coverage. This includes ways to save on the monthly premiums and out-of-pocket costs of coverage available through the Marketplace, and information about other programs, including Medicaid and the Children's Health Insurance Program (CHIP). The Marketplace encourages competition among private health plans, and is accessible through Web sites, call centers, and in-person assistance. In some states, the Marketplace is run by the state. In others, it is run by the federal government. Learn more by visiting www.healthcare.gov/what-is-the-marketplace-in-my-state.

Health Maintenance Organization (HMO)

A type of health insurance plan that usually limits coverage to care from doctors who work for or contract with the HMO. It generally won't cover out-of-network care except in an emergency. An HMO may require you to live or work in its service area to be eligible for coverage. HMOs often provide integrated care and focus on prevention and wellness.

Health Reimbursement Account (HRA)

HRAs are employer-funded group health plans from which employees are reimbursed tax-free for qualified medical expenses up to a fixed dollar amount per year. Unused amounts may be rolled over to be used in subsequent years. The employer funds and owns the account. Health Reimbursement Accounts are sometimes called Health Reimbursement Arrangements.

Health Savings Account (HSA)

A medical savings account available to taxpayers who are enrolled in a High Deductible Health Plan. The funds contributed to the account aren't subject to federal income tax at the time of deposit.

Funds must be used to pay for qualified medical expenses. Unlike a Flexible Spending Account (FSA), funds roll over year to year if you don't spend them.

High Deductible Health Plan (HDHP)

A plan that features higher deductibles than traditional insurance plans. High deductible health plans (HDHPs) can be combined with a health savings account or a health reimbursement arrangement to allow you to pay for qualified out-of-pocket medical expenses on a pre-tax basis.

In-network Coinsurance

The percent (for example, 20%) you pay of the allowed amount for covered health care services to providers who contract with your health insurance or plan. In-network coinsurance usually costs you less than out-of-network coinsurance.

In-network Copayment

A fixed amount (for example, $15) you pay for covered health care services to providers who contract with your health insurance or plan. In-network copayments usually are less than out-of-network copayments.

Individual Health Insurance Policy

Policies for people that aren't connected to job-based coverage. Individual health insurance policies are regulated under state law.

Insurance Co-op

A non-profit entity in which the same people who own the company are insured by the company. Cooperatives can be formed at a national, state, or local level, and can include doctors, hospitals, and businesses as member-owners.

Job-based Health Plan

Coverage that is offered to an employee (and often his or her family) by an employer. Also called Employer-Sponsored Insurance (ESI).

Medicaid

A state-administered health insurance program for low-income families and children, pregnant women, the elderly, people with disabilities, and in some states, other adults. The federal government provides a portion of the funding for Medicaid and sets guidelines for the program. States also have choices in how they design their program, so Medicaid varies state by state and may have a different name in your state.

Medicare

A state-administered health insurance program for people who are age 65 or older and certain younger people with disabilities. It also covers people with end-stage renal disease (permanent kidney failure requiring dialysis or a transplant, sometimes called ESRD).

Network

The facilities, providers, and suppliers your health insurer or plan has contracted with to provide health care services.

Network Plan

A health plan that contracts with doctors, hospitals, pharmacies, and other health care providers to provide members of the plan with services and supplies at a discounted price.

Non-preferred Provider

A provider who doesn't have a contract with your health insurer or plan to provide services to you. You'll typically pay more to see a non-preferred provider. Check your policy to see if you can go to all providers who have contracted with your health insurance or plan, or if your health insurance or plan has a “tiered” network and you must pay extra to see some providers.

Open Enrollment Period

The period of time during which individuals who are eligible to enroll in a Qualified Health Plan can enroll in a plan in the Marketplace. Individuals may also qualify for Special Enrollment Periods outside of Open Enrollment if they experience certain events.

You can apply for Medicaid or CHIP at any time of the year.

Out-of-network Coinsurance

The percentage (for example, 40%) you pay of the allowed amount for covered health care services to providers who don't contract with your health insurance or plan. Out-of-network coinsurance usually costs you more than in-network coinsurance.

Out-of-network Copayment

A fixed amount (for example, $30) you pay for covered health care services from providers who don't contract with your health insurance or plan. Out-of-network copayments usually are more than in-network copayments.

Out-of-pocket Costs

Your expenses for medical care that aren't reimbursed by insurance. Out-of-pocket costs include deductibles, coinsurance, and copayments for covered services plus all costs for services that aren't covered.

Out-of-pocket Maximum/Limit

The most you pay during a policy period (usually one year) before your health insurance or plan starts to pay 100% for covered essential health benefits. This limit must include deductibles, coinsurance, copayments, or similar charges and any other expenditure required of an individual which is a qualified medical expense for the essential health benefits. This limit does not typically include premiums, balance billing amounts for non-network providers and other out-of-network cost-sharing, or spending for non-essential health benefits.

Plan or Policy Year

A 12-month period of benefits coverage. 12-month period may not be the same as the calendar year. To find out when your plan year begins, you can check your plan documents or ask your employer. (Note: For individual health insurance policies this 12-month period is called a “policy year”.)

Point of Service (POS) Plans

A type of plan in which you pay less if you use doctors, hospitals, and other health care providers that belong to the plan's network. POS plans also require you to get a referral from your primary care physician in order to see a specialist. Some plans may have costs that are different for out-of-network care compared to in-network care, including a separate deductible and copay or coinsurance.

Pre-existing Condition

A health problem you had before the date that new health coverage starts.

Preauthorization

A decision by your health insurer or plan that a health care service, treatment plan, prescription drug, or durable medical equipment is medically necessary. Sometimes called prior authorization, prior approval, or precertification. Your health insurance or plan may require preauthorization for certain services before you receive them, except in an emergency. Preauthorization isn't a promise your health insurance or plan will cover the cost.

Preferred Provider

A provider who has a contract with your health insurer or plan to provide services to you at a certain cost. Check your policy to see if you can see all preferred providers or if your health insurance or plan has a “tiered” network and you must pay extra to see some providers. Your health insurance or plan may have preferred providers who are also “participating” providers. Participating providers also contract with your health insurer or plan, but the cost for care may be different, and you may have to pay more.

Preferred Provider Organization (PPO)

A type of health plan that contracts with medical providers, such as hospitals and doctors, to create a network of participating providers. You pay less in out-of-pocket costs if you use providers that belong to the plan's network. You can use doctors, hospitals, and providers outside of the network for an additional cost. Some plans may have out-of-pocket costs that are different for out-of-network care compared to in-network care, including a separate deductible and copay or coinsurance.

Premium

The amount that must be paid for your health insurance or plan. You and/or your employer usually pay it monthly, quarterly, or yearly.

Preventive Services

Routine health care that includes screenings, checkups, and patient counseling to prevent illnesses, disease, or other health problems.

Primary Care Physician

A physician (MD – Medical Doctor or DO – Doctor of Osteopathic Medicine) who directly provides or coordinates a range of health care services for a patient. Primary care providers include doctors, nurses, nurse practitioners, and physician assistants. They often maintain long-term relationships with you and advise and treat you on a range of health-related issues. They may also coordinate your care with specialists.

Prior Authorization

A decision by your health insurer or plan that a health care service, treatment plan, prescription drug, or durable medical equipment is medically necessary. Sometimes called preauthorization, prior approval or precertification. Your health insurance or plan may require prior authorization for certain services before you receive them, except in an emergency. Prior authorization isn't a promise your health insurance or plan will cover the cost.

Referral

A written order from your primary care doctor for you to see a specialist or get certain medical services. With some health plans, you need to get a referral before you get care from anyone other than your primary care doctor. Otherwise, the plan may not pay for it.

Special Enrollment Period

A time outside of the open enrollment period during which you and your family have a right to sign up for health coverage. In the Marketplace, you qualify for a special enrollment period 60 days following certain life events that involve a change in family status (for example, marriage or birth of a child) or loss of other health coverage. Job-based plans must provide a special enrollment period of 30 days.

Specialist

A doctor who focuses on one specific area of medicine. For example, a dermatologist is a specialist who focuses on skin problems. A cardiologist focuses on the heart and blood vessels. And so on.

Summary of Benefits and Coverage (SBC)

An easy-to-read summary that lets you make apples-to-apples comparisons of costs and coverage between health plans. You can compare options based on price, benefits, and other features that may be important to you. You'll get the "Summary of Benefits and Coverage" (SBC) when you shop for coverage on your own or through your job, renew or change coverage, or request an SBC from the health insurance company.

Urgent Care Center

These walk-in centers are for people who have an illness or injury that needs care right away, but isn't life-threatening. These centers can be useful when your regular doctor's office is closed. Some insurance plans cover medical care you get at an urgent care center. But to be sure, call your insurance company before you visit one.

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